Book Review – White Night (Dresden Files #9) by Jim Butcher

Good Morning, Blogland!

Today I’m going to talk about White Night by Jim Butcher. I listened to this audiobook a couple weeks ago now, so this might not be as detailed as my book reviews usually are.

Beware the spoilers!

White night

So, this book picks up about a year after Proven Guilty. Harry is still a Warden, Molly is his apprentice, and Murphy lost her position as the Chief of Special Investigations. Thomas is still oddly aloof, and Harry can tell he’s been feeding again, but other than that, he knows nothing.

Things seem pretty calm, until Murphy calls Harry in to check out the scene of a suspected suicide. Turns out, there are some supernatural forces at work, picking off low-level practitioner women, and making it look like suicide. Now, these women aren’t strong enough practitioners to be members of the White Council, but they are citizens of Chicago, and that means they are Harry’s responsibility. He takes the case.

This book is great because all of my favorite characters make an appearance. Butters is around because he lets Harry into the morgue to inspect a corpse. Mouse is around for almost every scene, because that dog is freaking awesome, and really good at protecting people. Murphy’s investigating with Harry by taking some personal leave. Ramirez gets called in when the going gets tough, and even Elaine shows up because she was hired by the remaining cadre of women fearing for their lives.

And then there’s Thomas. He’s a main suspect of this book, which I balked at immediately. The evidence all points to him, but I love  Thomas and will defend him to my dying breath. I knew he wasn’t killing those women.

He was saving them.

Duh-Doi, Harry!

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Harry and  Thomas on the cover the of the graphic novel “Warcry”

So, Thomas is in the book a lot, which is always a good thing. And to be perfectly honest, any book that has  Ramirez and Thomas is almost guaranteed to be one of my favorites. I love snarky, cocky men. So sue me.

Anyway, it turns out there’s a plot by the White Court (Thomas’ type of vampire) trying to frame Harry for the murders so that the Court can move against the Council, as well as dethrone the Raiths (Thomas’ direct family, currently the leaders of the White Court). Harry calls their bluff and enters into a duel with the two vamps responsible for the murders, with Ramirez as his dueling partner.

Shit goes sideways quick, because it turns out the White Court wasn’t acting on their own. Remember Cowl, from Dead Beat? He was a powerful Necromancer that Dresden tried to crush with a car and couldn’t. Yeah, he’s back and he’s working for the Black Council trying to squish what remains of the White Council while it’s vulnerable in its war with the Red Court.

You know, when I started reading Dresden all those years ago, I never imagined it would get so political. I ain’t even mad.

Anyway, Cowl was helping from the Nevernever, causing all kinds of problems with a never-ending army of super-soldier ghouls. Pretty much the entire White Court, except for the Raiths, dies. Harry very nearly dies. Ramirez takes a knife to the calf and one to the gut and I almost cried. If Butcher kills Carlos Ramirez, I will riot. Thomas survives pretty much unscathed in true Thomas fashion, but he risks it all to save Justine, his former meal/lover of choice, whom he is madly in love with and therefore can never be with again.

Carlos Ramirez

Warden Carlos Ramirez, also in “Warcry”

That’s a whole long story that you should be caught up on if you’ve read the books.

But, the only reason any of them live is because John Marcone rides in with mercenaries and riddles the place with bullets. Oh, and plants a bomb to destroy the cave they were battling in.

I’m not really doing this scene justice, it was long and action packed and really well done, with lots of moving pieces to keep track of. By the end of it, Harry and the White Court are on thin ice, Ramirez and Elaine are hospitalized but will survive. The deaths are avenged and the practitioners of Chicago are safe once more.

And Harry finally finds out what the hell Thomas does to make so much money… He went to cosmetology school and opened his own Salon. Yep. Thomas, at work, is  Thomas (the French pronunciation: Toe-mah), a gay, French rockstar hairstylist. He makes the big bucks and is able to feed discretely without hurting anyone.

I laughed so hard, because it’s ridiculous and yet so perfectly Thomas.  The book ends with the brothers enjoying a laugh at the whole scenario, a rare and warm moment between them.

There are other developments throughout the book, including some big stuff between Dresden and Lasciel, and a coming clean discussion between Dresden and Ramirez. They had a rough summer in New Mexico when ghouls attacked and killed several Wardens-in-Training on their watch. Suffice it to say, I already loved Ramirez as a character, but he is now precious to me and I will defend him with my life.

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Thomas and Ramirez working together in “Warcry”, because dreams do come true.

As usual, the narration by James Marsters was A+ quality. He had to read a really terrible scene in which a mother holds her dying child and his narration made me pause so I could pull myself together. It was… haunting. I can no longer even entertain ideas of reading these books instead of listening to them. It’s just not an option any more.

Needless to say, I love this series, and plan on continuing it until I’m all caught up.

Unfortunately my reading has really slowed lately as I’m trying to finish my fanfic before NaNoWriMo. But, hopefully I can finish The Stone Sky soon-ish.

Until then, Blogland!

 

BZ

 

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Book Review – The Dire King by William Ritter

Hello Blogland,

We’re here today to talk about the fourth and final book in Ritter’s Jackaby series. I have read and reviewed them all, Jackaby, Beastly Bones, Ghostly Echoes, and now The Dire King.

If you don’t want to be spoiled, know that I rated this book 5 stars on Goodreads. It made me laugh a lot, and I cried a couple of times. I think this was Ritter’s best book so far, and I look forward to what he will do next, now that Jackaby is concluded.

There are spoilers ahead, as usual. So, you’ve been warned.

the dire king

The Dire King finds New Fiddleham in quite a state. The Mayor has not coped well with the fact that his beloved wife was an Nixie in disguise for the last 10 years, and has decided to arrest every non-human citizen of New Fiddleham.

Turns out, the city is chock-a-block full of all kinds of faeries and goblins, giants and gnomes, and everything in between. When Jackaby goes to the jail and witnesses the chaos of so many fair folk behind bars, he earns his place among some of my favorite characters ever.

He’s furious, and full of this righteous anger that was beautiful to witness. “We cannot make the world less awful by being more so ourselves.”

That’s some powerful shit right there, and I had to stop reading for a moment to let it sink in.  I hope you do too.

Anyway, Mayor Spade releases them all, telling them that Jackaby’s house is the only safe place for them, so suddenly the quirky house on Augur lane is bursting at the seams with supernatural folk.

Including something that even Jackaby had never seen. The creature is called a Twain. It’s ancient and full of pure, old magic, and typically comes in pairs. It’s described as tiny, and furry, but bipedal. I pictured a tiny, brown Lorax.

the lorax

Apparently this is something that Ritter created, because I cannot find anything about Twains on the internet that aren’t related to Mark. And I have to say he did a wonderful job! The Twain, which was alone (a red flag for a creature that comes into being with a soul mate), was enigmatic and interesting, and extremely foreboding.

the Twain explains that his mate gave her life to create the Crown, Shield, and  Spear of the original Dire King, saving his life. Twains are incredibly powerful creatures created of raw magic. Giving their lives is the greatest magical act possible, and giving their life is the greatest gift a Twain can do.

On top of all this tension in the household is the fact that Charlie Cane is preparing to propose to Abigail, a fact that Jackaby makes a point to share with his assistant. I was pissed when he did that; you can’t just spoil a proposal! Come on , man!

Oh yeah, and the fact that the evil Unseelie forces are working together to revive the Dire King and sunder the veil that separates the Anwynn and Earth. You know, little things.

Despite all this tension, the book flies along, and I laughed a lot, because this book feels like a reunion. All my favorite characters from the past books come back. Hank Hudson, Charlie Cane, Hotun, Nudd the Goblin Pirate Captain, Miss Lee, among others.

So, Jackaby and company must figure out who the Dire King actually is, and how to stop him. Unseelie forces are growing, and even Jackaby’s ragtag army of supernatural beings can’t come close to beating them.

But, they get help from an unexpected source. Pavel, the fangless vampire that tried to kill Abigail in the third book. He was betrayed by the Dire King, and seeks his revenge. So, he leads Jackaby,  Jenny, and Abigail through a rend in the veil, and into the heart of the Dire King’s stronghold.

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He then, of course, tries to kill them, and of course, dies himself. But, not before he breaks Jenny’s amulet that lets her travel beyond the house on Augur lane. She fades away, and neither Abigail nor Jackaby know if the ghost could survive her dissolution from the Anwynn.

They move on, and discover the giant machine that the Dire King has developed to tear the veil. The key to the machine’s success is the eyes of the Seer, which means he needs Jackaby.

Things get out of control from there very quickly. Jackaby is captured, the Seelie forces arrive, only to be drained by the machine, and Jackaby’s militia storm the stronghold.

And Charlie Cane dies.

Yep.  I didn’t believe it at first. I freaked out, screamed, cried. Charlie was hands down my favorite, and I was not in a place where I was ready to accept that Charlie was dead. He never even got to propose.

I had to stop reading for a bit at that moment. But I held out hope. Jackaby had just taken a spear to the chest a chapter before and survived, so I thought maybe something like that would happen for Charlie.

charlie cane

So, Abigail is crushed, she watched her boyfriend die at the hands of the Dire King, and Jackaby is hooked up to this terrible machine that will use his Sight to destroy the world as they know it. And he can only see one way to save everyone.

When the Seer dies, the Sight goes to the person they are looking at. And so Jackaby stares at Abigail and whispers, “I’m sorry.”

He dies. Yep. People are dropping like flies in this book and I was not okay with it! Please stop murdering all my favorites!

And the Sight flows to Abigail. It’s overwhelming and beautiful and gives her what she needs to convince Charlie’s sister to join her and defeat the Dire King. The backlash of the power of the machine unloading and repairing the veil is too much for Abigail and her new capability, and she passes out, but not before seeing Jenny hovering over Jackaby, her ghostly hands submerged into his chest.

She nearly dies in the darkness of her unconsciousness, and the Reaper visits her, offering to take her to Charlie. But, Abigail refuses, because the world needs her, and needs the Sight.  Because she wants to continue Charlie’s work.

When she comes to, Jackaby is alive, resuscitated by Jenny who literally pumped his heart back to life in her hands. But, the Sight is hers now, for as long as she lives. Charlie is still dead, and the casualties to both the Seelie and Unseelie forces are great.

Alina, Charlie’s sister is made Queen of the Anwynn, although she treats it more as a Stewardship, vowing to make her brother proud and pay for her treachery.  But, Abigail is numb to it all, distracted by her new Sight and her pain at the loss of Charlie.

A couple days go by, and Jackaby is there for her, helping her learn to understand what she sees, but she’s hollow. She recognizes the beauty of the library now, she can see the magical auras around the books and understands Jackaby’s methods, but she can’t feel it.

abigail rook

And that’s when the Twain returns. He speaks with Abigail, acknowledging her pain, and realizes that Charlie was her Twain. He asks why she didn’t take the Reaper’s offer of death, why she didn’t go to Charlie. And she tells him that she could honor Charlie more in life than she could in death. The Twain is surprised, but vanishes.

At the funeral, Abigail sees the Twain, but no one else does. He walks up the center aisle and stands on Charlie’s casket. He looks at Abigail and tells her that he hopes she makes good on his gift and will use it to make the world a better place. Together.

The Twain drops down into the casket and there is a bright flash of light as Abigail sprints up the aisle.

THAT’S HOW THE BOOK ENDS!!!!!

WHAT?! Like…. WHAT? How can you end the book like that? It’s the last book!!! How can you leave me hanging? I mean, I believe in my heart that Charlie was resurrected by the Twain, but damn, a reunion kiss would be nice…

What this really means is that I really hope Ritter will continue his New Fiddleham stories. This is the last Jackaby novel, but at the end of this novel Abigail Rook is the Seer, and even the house recognizes her as a Private Investigator as she enters. So, all my hopes and dreams are pinned on the continuation of this franchise, but with Abigail as the Seer.

Please, William Ritter. PLEASE! I need more! I need more time in New Fiddleham, and I need more Abigail and Charlie! PLEASE!

Sorry this was so long, but this book had a ton of stuff going on, and all of it was important. I think this was some of Ritter’s best writing, and he juggled the multitude of plot points and character arcs really admirably.  I’m heartbroken that this could be the end for New Fiddleham, though I understand that he probably wants to write something else, at least for a little while.  I get it… just, come back someday? Please?

Anyway, I’ve got Audient Void business tonight, and am listening to the next Dresden book, and slowly reading The Stone Sky. Hopefully you’ll see another book review next week.

Until then, Blogland,

 

BZ

Book Review – Proven Guilty by Jim Butcher

Hello  Blogland!

It’s a dreary Saturday here in the Willamette Valley, and I get to enjoy the view of raindrops and falling leaves from the lobby of yet another Starbucks. This one is close to my work, which is always a little weird because I see library patrons out in the wild. Not always a good thing, I realize, as my “Scooby Doo Villain” shuffles past me.

This week is going really well. I feel good. Accomplished, and excited for next week. I don’t want to go into too many details here, because I’ll be back on Monday to talk about goals and what’s ahead and all that.

So, let’s get on with the Book Review already! As usual, this is where I warn that there are spoilers ahead. Enter if ye dare!

proven guilty cover

Proven Guilty is the eighth installment of Jim Butcher’s popular Urban Fantasy Noir series, The Dresden Files. I’ve tried to read these books for the better part of ten years but always get waylaid or distracted. It wasn’t until I ventured into the world of audiobooks that I became rather fascinated with the series, largely thanks to the wonderful narration by James Martsers (Spike from Buffy the Vampire  Slayer). He is now my accepted canon for Dresden’s voice, and he just does such a wonderful job on these books in every way, it really revolutionizes them for me.

Plus, I can now call up Dresden’s growls of “Fuego!” and “Forzare!” with incredible accuracy at will, so there’s always a giggle just a thought away.

So, in this book, Harry is coming to terms with the events of the last book. If you need a refresher course, check out my review. He’s pretty glum in this one, and is trying to cope with a big chunk of self-loathing. The book opens with the Warden’s executing a teenager that’s used forbidden magic, another tense conversation between Harry and Ebenezer, and a cryptic message from the White Council about Black Magic on the loose in Chicago sets the tone of the book as pretty damn grim.

But, that all changes when the Carpenters’ oldest daughter, Molly, calls Harry to bail her boyfriend out of jail. Remember that the Carpenters are Michael and Charity, the most wholesome and good people Harry knows. Hell, Michael is one of the Knights of the Cross, and wields an actual magical sword named Amoracchius against the forces of Evil in the name of God.

Yeah. So, when Harry pulls up at the station to see Molly in all black Goth regalia, wearing a button that reads “Splattercon!!!” (Martsers read it, ‘Splattercon, exclamation point, exclamation point, exclamation point,’ every single time and it was hilarious) the wizard is rightfully perplexed.

Turns out, Molly left home and is working at a Horror Film Convention with her boyfriend. But, things have been weird at the Con, and a local theater owner was attacked by mysterious means.

And so Harry is on the job.

It seems simple enough: find the baddies calling forth these mindless fae known as Fetches, who live on fear and so are manifesting as horror film terrors. All he has to do is a fairly complex spell that will bounce the Fetches back at the ones calling them, easy enough for the only practicing Wizard in Chicago’s yellow pages. Except, Dresden’s plan backfires. Bad.

The Fetches attack Molly, who had just been sent home with her mother. Where all the other Carpenter children live. Realizing what happened, and also realizing that means Molly must have done Black Magic for the Fetches to attack her, Dresden rushes to the Carpenter household.

Good news? Only one child was hurt, and he will be okay. Bad news? Molly was taken by the Fetches.  Best news? Charity is on the offensive and reveals herself as a complete badass. And I mean, COMPLETE BADASS. Chain mail-wearing, sword-wielding, faerie-killing badass.

Other good news? Harry brings in the whole crew on this one. Murphy, Thomas, the  Summer Knight and Summer Lady, and of course Mouse! It was awesome to see all these characters come together.

Dresden Files art

What was less awesome was that their hunt for Molly led them to the heart of the Winter Court, where it’s rumored that Queen Mab has gone insane. They run into Lea, Dresden’s godmother, who’s been taken hostage by the Mab, and shit gets a bit… complex from there.

Summer and Winter courts are on the verge of their own war, which keeps either from coming to the aid of the White Council in its war against the Vampires, which is going pretty poorly, by the way.

But, politics aside, they save the girl and barely manage to escape Faerie. It seems like they’ve won the day. And they did. But, Dresden and Charity both know there’s yet another threat looming. Molly used her magic to alter the minds of her boyfriend and her best friend, because both of them were addicted to heroin. But, mind control is considered one of the Blackest of Magics.

The White Council cannot abide the use of Black Magic. That’s why the Wardens exist. And Harry is a Warden. He has to report the happenings of his region to the Council. And they are very likely to call for Molly’s execution.

There’s a trial, and the Merlin has pulled strings and manipulated the system so that he alone represents the majority of the vote. It’s not looking good for Molly, and Dresden fears he might be forced to fight his fellow Wardens to keep his promise to the Carpenters to protect their daughter. But then Ebenezer breezes in, with the remainder of the White Council, and they take the votes from the Merlin.

Molly is allowed to live, as long as she is Dresden’s apprentice, and abides by all the Council’s rules. Should she break them, she and Dresden will pay the price.

There’s more little details throughout the book that set up side plots going forward, like Thomas’ mysterious new job, the revelation that Mouse isn’t a dog (although what he actually is has yet to be revealed), and that Murph lost her post as the head of Special Investigations.

dresden mouse

Yeah… he might be more than just a dog.

You know, important-ish stuff.

If you couldn’t tell, I really liked this book. I think it rates about even with its predecessor, but for completely different reasons. Dead Beat was amazing because there was a ton of really cool magic being flung around, and Harry resurrected a fucking Tyrannosaurus Rex. This book was amazing because of the complex political machinations happening all over the place, all with Harry in the middle. Where Dead Beat was a romping magical action flick, Proven Guilty was a political drama with some cool fight scenes sprinkled in.

I highly recommend this series, by the way.  Just sayin’.

I just finished reading The Dire King yesterday, so will have that book review out next week. I’m moving on to The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin, and will read Dark Sky by Mike Brooks after that. I’m not sure when I’ll pick up the next Dresden book, White Night, but I have the audiobook on my computer. I just need to load it onto my phone and I can get started.

So, I’ll talk at you all come Monday so I can go over goals and results, and set new goals!

Until then, Blogland.

 

BZ

 

Book Review – The Glass Magician by Charlie N. Holmberg

Blogland!

I finally have a calm moment to try and write this book review.

Oregon is… in a weird place right now. A vast majority of the state is in flames as forest fires ravage my green home. Salem is nestled in the Willamette Valley, and is safe (so far) from the wildfires, but the Columbia River Gorge, Central Cascades, and Southern Oregon are all on fire. Ash is falling from the sky in Salem, coating cars and outdoor furniture, and tainting the air in a grayish-brown haze that makes breathing uncomfortable for many.

It’s pretty tragic, and terrifying.

But, that’s just another disastrous event I can tack on to this summer. I worry for the forests and natural beauty of Oregon, and my thoughts go to the people these fires have displaced. I heard it might rain on Thursday, and I sincerely hope it helps.

But, let’s talk about The Glass Magician!

Theglassmagician

Blah blah Spoilers Ahead blah blah

In this sequel to the very enjoyable The Paper Magician, Ceony must face the consequences of the first book.

It’s been three months since the events of the first book, and life has gone back to normal for Ceony and Emery Thane, much to Ceony’s dismay. You see, she saw her future with Emery in the fortuity box, and she’s eager to get their romance rolling. But, though she now calls him by his first name, and they’ve fallen into comfortable domestic routines, they have carefully danced around their feelings for one another.

When Ceony is at the center of a series of attacks from the Lira’s cohorts (Emery’s ex-wife, and Excisioner baddie from the first book) things begin to heat up between the Magician and his apprentice. One scene that stood out was when Emery asked Ceony why she did all she did to save his heart. Her response was quiet and almost hurt, “don’t ask me that. You know why.”

Cue that painful disgusted sound that is synonymous with getting your heart twisted and wrung out to dry.

Her answer didn’t make Emery deny her words or even deny his own feelings, but he did share his doubts about the morality of such a relationship, between a Magician and his apprentice. That was enough of an admission for Ceony. But, the subtle change in their relationship doesn’t go unnoticed.

Magician Aviosky, the Glass Magician that mentored Ceony before she graduated from Pragis Taff, has suspicions that the relationship between Ceony and Thane may not be purely professional or scholarly, and she greatly disapproves.

So, not only are they trying to avoid death at the hands of crazy Excisioners (Magicians who have Bonded to blood), but they’re trying to keep nosy busy-bodies out of their private business. Even if those busy-bodies might have a point.

The best part of the book, for me, was when Emery was headed to the train station to hunt down Saraj (Bad Guy #2), leaving Ceony behind in London. She gets out of the cab, and fearing that she may never see Mg. Thane again, calls across the courtyard, “If you’re going to get yourself killed, the least you could do is kiss me goodbye!”

And he DOES IT! I definitely squealed, chock-a-block full of that ridiculous giddy feeling when two characters FINALLY get together.

foamingfan

Me when Emery actually KISSED Ceony!

But, that was one shining bright moment that was quickly snuffed by the end of the book. Not story-wise, though that does get dark very quickly. But, writing-wise. Ceony is left on her own, dropped off at Mg.  Aviosky’s house in London. When she arrives she finds that Grath Cobalt (Bad Guy #1), who is actually a Glass Magician, not an Excisioner, has killed Aviosky’s apprentice and tortured Mg. Aviosky herself.

Some epic shit goes down, and Ceony does some quick thinking to save the day before she passes out and the point of view shifts to Emery…

WHAT? Like… WHAT THE WHAT? You can’t just do that! You can’t just knock your main character unconscious and then swap POV when you have literally NEVER SWAPPED POV BEFORE!

It felt cheap. The easy way out from a writing perspective. We watch Emery deal with Saraj, for a short chapter, and then go back to Ceony’s POV in which she awakes and Emery is already back and everything is said and done. WHAT?!

I’m still pretty worked up about it, and I think the only thing that could fix it for me is if the next book, The Master Magician, alternates point of view consistently. Otherwise I will continue to feel a bit put out over this.

Another thing I was less than satisfied with is the ending itself. The book sort of just… ends. The bad guys are handled, Ceony will be okay, and Emery is there. But, she broke her Bond to paper in order to Bond with glass and defeat Grath. She tells Emery this, and how she needs sand to break her Bond with glass so she can go back to paper, and he is confused but so relieved she’s all right that he just sort of nods and promises to get her some.

the paper magician

That’s it. That’s the end. No demand for an explanation of how she somehow managed to break the main tenet of their magic system, no in scene moment of performing the ritual and re-Bonding with paper. Nothing.

I really enjoyed the majority of this book, but the last 20 pages or so left me feeling gypped (I really don’t like this word but it is the right one in this scenario). When your book is only 213 pages long, you can’t have a reader upset at 10% of them. Just saying.

Anyway, I have all my hopes pinned on the last book in the series. Hopefully it will redeem this one for me. Either way, I love the characters enough to keep reading. It’ll be a little while before I get to that one though, since I’m still reading The Stone Sky, and about a million other things at once.

Okay, that’s an exaggeration, but it feels like it. Check out my Goodreads to keep tabs on my ridiculous reading schedule as I try to make up for lost time to get to 65 books this year.

And until next time, Blogland,

 

BZ

Book Review – Dead Beat (Dresden Files #7) by Jim Butcher

Well. Here I am. Writing a book review for the first time in months. Huh.

Gotta say, this is weird. But it feels damn good. If you’re keeping up on my Goodreads page, then you know that I’ve been reading up a storm the last few days. I don’t plan on slowing down, either.

Also, I had a bit of a breakthrough on the fanfic while I was in the shower today (of course), so I should make some serious progress on it over the next week or so.

My aunts have been staying with us this whole week, camped out in my writing room, so things have been a bit out of sorts for me. Even now  I’m typing this from the kitchen table, listening to Incubus in my headphones while Trevor plays his video games in his office. I didn’t realize how used to my routine I’d become, but man, this week has put it into perspective.

I started a new short story, and it’s really rough right now. I’m not sure if it’ll ever turn into more than some weird little tale, but I had a really great time writing it, so that seems good enough for now. I’ve also been doing a bit of research on the requirements for membership with the SFWA (Science Fiction and Fantasy Writer’s Association) which then spiraled out into all kinds of interesting searches about publishers, agents, and magazines with open submissions.

So, long story short, my brain is kicking back into writing mode, and I couldn’t be happier.

Now that you’ve got the short version of my thoughts these last few days, have a book review! This is the part where I tell you that there are spoilers below…

Dead_Beat
This book took me entirely too long to read. I started it as a digital audiobook on loan from the library back at the beginning of April. I was in the height of my Mass Effect playing then, so the poor recording was left neglected except for when I had a migraine. The digital loans aren’t renewable, and of course there were a bunch of holds on it, so I couldn’t get the audiobook again. I told myself that, since I owned the paperback, I’d just commit to finishing it the old-fashioned way.

Four months later I finally cracked it open and finished it in a couple of days. Because it was good! I know there’s no point in being upset with myself or trying to feel guilty about my sabbatical, but damn. I could have been so much farther in the series by now!

In this installment, Dresden is tasked with fighting off the Disciples of Kemmler, a notoriously evil necromancer whose acolytes are all vying for Godhood on a particularly stormy  Halloween. To make matters worse, Mavra, of the Black Court Vampires, also wants the “Word of Kemmler”, the necromancer’s book that all the Disciples are after. Within the book lies a ritual for calling forth the Erlking, lord of the Wild Hunt, and unlocks power that would bequeath enough power to make one a God.

So, a typical Thursday night for Harry.

big_dead_beat

Cover art for Wizard at Large, an omnibus of Blood Rites and Dead Beat, by Dan dos Santos.

 

But, shit gets pretty intense, pretty freaking fast. There’s necromancy galore, with zombies and spirits and ghouls running rampant. Butters, the coroner, tags along with Harry the whole time, and Thomas and Mouse are large players as well; a full cast of my favorite people.

Murphy is conveniently elsewhere for the duration of the novel, and I’m excited to see how her Hawaiian vacation with Kincaid went. It was obvious in the beginning of the novel that she wanted Harry to be jealous or to try and stop her, but he’s Dresden. He didn’t do any of that even though he really wanted to. He respects Murph way too much to audibly question her romantic entanglements.

Which… come on! Just kiss already!

Anyway, nothing is ever easy for Harry, and this book in particular put the wizard through the wringer. The Red Court did some dirty fighting to deliver a crippling blow to the White Council, almost completely decimating the Wardens. It was really cool to see the Wardens in action, and one in particular, Ramirez, was a new favorite character. Of course, that means his life is in immediate danger, because I like him way more than I should. Sorry, Ramirez.

Also, Butters gets ragged on by Thomas the whole book for being a coward, and then does some insanely badass shit in order to save Harry, including riding on the back of a resurrected Tyrannosaurus Rex whilst using his one-man polka suit to keep a drum beat.

 

Because Polka will never die.

And behind all of this is the longer arc of the war between the White Council and the Red Court, and the even longer arc of Dresden and Lasciel, the fallen angel he thought he’d locked away beneath two feet of cement in his basement. Yeah, she makes an appearance or three, and it’s some weird shit.

Anyway, I feel really rusty at this whole book review thing, but I needed to do this before  I got too deep into the next  Dresden book and couldn’t keep the details separate. Despite how long it took for me to finish this book, I really loved it. If you’ve made it this far through Dresden, are you really gonna give up on it now?

A sincere thanks to all of you that continued to visit the blog, even though I was gone for so long. I knew it’d be a while,but I didn’t think it’d be almost five months… But, I’m back now, and looking forward to balancing projects and getting back into my more productive routines.

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Me, twirling through my TBR list.

I’m reading about five things right now, so I have no idea what the next book review will be. Probably The Atlantis Complex (Artemis Fowl #7) by Eoin Colfer, because I just finished it. I’m also listening to Alan Cumming’s autobiography, Not My Father’s Son, which is phenomenal so far. I’m also listening to Zombie Spaceship Wasteland, Patton Oswalt’s first book, and enjoying myself. And I’m reading Preludes & Nocturnes (The Sandman #1) by Neil Gaiman.

Good gravy. I really am trying to make up for lost time. I’m exhausted just thinking about it. So, stick around for more blog posts as my reading and writing reestablishes a working rhythm.

Until then, Blogland!

 

BZ

Book Review – The Paper Magician by Charlie N. Holmberg

Good evening Blogland!

Sorry this is so late, but I procrastinated by talking with out of town family for hours today. Then I helped walk Trevor through some stretches before he got into his workout today. So, here I am ready to talk all about our book club meeting and The Paper Magician.

Last night the book club congregated at Taproot, our favorite local bar with healthy eats and a very laid-back atmosphere. Towards the back of thetaproot building there’s a nook I refer to as the Book  Nook, where the owner (who also was the Officiant at my wedding) put up a ton of shelves with old hardback books from library rummage sales. Coupled with the worn, comfortable couches and custom wood coffee and end tables, it’s the perfect spot to meet.

And everyone showed up! Those of you following along these last couple years know that it’s a rare meeting when everyone’s in attendance and everyone read the book. I was really excited last night.

But, I’m even more excited because everyone was really thrilled with The Paper Magician.

This is the part where  I tell you that there are spoilers ahead. You were warned.

The book is set in the late 1800s, just outside of London. Ceony Twill has just graduated from The Tagis Praff School for the Magically Inclined, in half the time, only to have her hopes crushed. She wanted to be a Smelter, a magician who deals in metal, but instead will be a Folder- a magician bonded to Paper. Print

It’s important to note that once a magician has bonded with their element, all other forms of magic are unavailable to them

While Ceony never really reveals why she wanted to desperately to be a Smelter, she is crushed when she’s delivered to the home of Mg. Emery Thane, who is to be her mentor for the next 2-6 years.

And though he’s younger than she imagined, and attractive in a thin, nerdy way, she’s an absolute brat her first day with him. He knew that Folding was not what she wanted, and he did his damnedest to show her the wonders of Folding, all prepared before her arrival. Paper snowflakes, cut and painstakingly Folded, and then imbued with a chill all of their own. An entire garden of paper tulips, blooming in the wind. Paper birds flitting about the house, and Jonto, a paper skeleton capable of simple butler-esque tasks.

Oh! And, on the second day, after seeing her stroking a small dog collar mournfully, Thane stayed up all night to fold her a small paper dog, who she names Fennel. He’s the size of a terrier, and has all the anatomy of a dog, Folded in complicated patterns and links. That gesture made me cry pretty good.

And so Ceony starts her studies. But, just as she’s coming around to her lot in life, prepping meals and memorizing her Folds, Emery’s ex-wife shows up and rips his heart of his chest. Literally. She’s what’s known as an Excisioner, a magician who manipulates human flesh. It’s a forbidden practice, and one Ceony knows nothing pretty much nothing about.

Ceony’s quick thinking saves the Magician, but only temporarily. A paper heart, no matter how well Folded (her’s wasn’t) can only last so long. So she sets out, against the Magician Councils orders, to retrieve Emery’s heart and save his life.

Using some advanced magic left behind by Thane, Ceony is able to track Lira (the ex-wife) to a secluded cave on the coast, and there she has the  Magician’s heart in a ceremonial bowl of his own blood.

Unsure of how else to get the heart back, Ceony uses her small pistol on the woman, only to find that the Excisioner was able to manipulate her flesh into spitting the bullet out.

This woman means business. But so does Ceony, because she was starting to fall for Emery. And she refused to go home without his heart.

Lira worked some dark magic that sends Ceony into Emery Thane’s heart, and there she’s on the run, fleeing through the chambers of his still beating heart to try and escape the evil woman, as well as find a way out.

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Fanart entered in a competition, Pages of Adventure by Jynette Tigner

Ceony learns a lot about Thane as she travels through his heart. Each chamber has a different theme to the memories. Good memories, bad memories, hopes, and fears are all presented, and Ceony must maneuver through them to find a way out.

I don’t want to give too much away, because I really liked this portion of the book. What a crazy cool way to develop a character, by literally taking a stroll through his heart!

I didn’t expect to enjoy this book so much, especially since it’s so short, only 213 pages. The world building is thin, and the clubbers had some questions in that regard, same as I did. Are Magicians a public fact? How much do magicians earn? How many are there? These kinds of things. We wanted more!

But, ultimately, this story is about Ceony and Emery, and establishing the magic, which is all done very well. The book club agreed, all of them eager to read on to the next books. I already have the rest of the trilogy on the Library Book table, waiting for me to finish up with The Six-Gun Tarot.

So, I very much recommend this book. It’s whimsical, romantic, and cute, but also has some darkness to it that keeps it from being too sappy. You can tell it’s Holmberg’s first novel, but I have every confidence that things get ironed out as she continues to tell Ceony’s story. As it is, I did enjoy the dialogue and the prose very much, and I will admit that I would read aloud to myself in British accents, because I’m a nerd like that.

Don’t worry, only my dog was subjected to it. I was otherwise very much alone.

Anyway, I hope you all give The Paper Magician a shot. It was a ton of fun, and I look forward to reading more from this author.

Until next time, Blogland.

 

BZ

Book Review – Beastly Bones by William Ritter

Hello, Blogland.

I’ve been a busy little reader these last few days, and have completed both Jackaby novels, as well as a few installments of Locke & Key. Pop over to the “What I’m Reading” page to get a full update.

Today we’re here to discuss the second novel in the Jackaby series, Beastly Bones. If you’ve not read my review of Jackaby, now would be the time.

beastly-bonesIn this installment, Abigail and Jackaby find themselves on a case in Gad’s Valley, which is lovely since that’s where Charlie Barker, formerly Charlie Cane, now resides. There’s been a string of murders, seemingly unrelated save for a peculiar wound to the neck: a single puncture surrounded by bruising.

Along the way they catch up with an old friend of Jackaby’s, Hank Hudson. He’s a hunter and trapper, with a focus on unusual creatures. He’s also huge. I pictured him like a frontiersman Hagrid, but less approachable.

On this adventure, Abigail is torn. The official reason they’re sent to Gad’s Valley is to track down a stolen fossil, and her paleontology roots call to her. It was really great to see Abigail in her element, and she had several occasions to one up the male experts who were quick to disregard her. Jackaby was proud of her, but her interest and aptitude meant that he spent a bit of his time on his own, hunting the unseen forces behind the theft.

being-clever

I’m still waiting for a moment like this…

As the story goes on, things remain relatively light. The two paleontologists bicker and argue over all sorts of minutia, there’s a femme fatale reporter who befriends Abigail, and Abigail has a few delightfully awkward encounters with Charlie, who is even more endearing in this book.

 

But, when it appears that an actual dragon, thought extinct for a few thousand years, is terrorizing the valley, things get dark quick. Houses are razed, a nearby couple are killed, and in the final battle the reporter, Nellie Fuller, sacrifices herself to give Jackaby and Abigail time to figure something out.

And, Abigail does. That was my favorite part of this story. Abigail saves the day, and Jackaby’s life. She’s the hero, finally the strong female character, even if she refuses to see herself that way. But, as they say, the proof is in the pudding. Abigail even kisses Charlie by the very end! Very bold indeed.

But, the events of Gad’s Valley also trouble her immensely, giving Jackaby the opportunity to wax philosophical, as he often does, and it’s always a treat. But, the events also set the stage for the next book, and help establish a larger arc for the series.

I would say that this book is very much Abigail’s. Though she’s the main character of the series, the first book had to introduce us to Jackaby and his unique place and function in the world. Now, with all that established, Abigail had the opportunity to really grow and shine.

Ritter did a good job of making his likeable narrator even more so, and keeping things fun while he did.

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William Ritter

That would be my number one selling point of these books. They’re fun. The characters are endearing and well-developed, and the city of New Fiddleham feels like home. I want to spend time in this world, with these people. I’m happy to report that the third book is probably the best of them all, and the next book is due out this summer!

There’s no shortage of time with Abigail and Co., just yet.

Unrelated to the actual plot or books, I found out that William Ritter is a local author. He lives in Springfield, Oregon, about an hour south of Salem, near Eugene. He’s an educator, and I look forward to catching him during his promotion of the next book, The Dire King.

Aaaand, I just read that it’s the conclusion of the series. I am not OK with that. Not in the least. How can that be the end? There’s too many possibilities! You can’t just wrapghostly-echoes everything up in one book, right?

Now I’m sad. Damn it. Well, I’ll see you all tomorrow when I return with the book review for Ghostly Echoes.

Until then, Blogland…

 

BZ