Book Review – Lies Sleeping (Rivers of London #7) by Ben Aaronovitch

Blogland,

I’ve had a really great and productive weekend, and just finally made time to sit down and write this review. I’m also watching N.K. Jemisin play Mass Effect 3 on Twitch right now, so I’m a little distracted. But, man, what a time to be alive!

On to the review!

Goodreads Rating: 5/5 Stars

lies sleeping

Lies Sleeping is the long awaited seventh novel in the Rivers of London series. If you’re not caught up, you should probably stop reading now. No. Seriously. SPOILERS AHOY. If you are caught up, but could use a refresher, I have posted reviews of all of the previous six novels and you can find links to them in my 2018 What I’m Reading list.

But, for real. There’s no going back after this. Are you sure you wish to proceed?

…..
…..

…..
…..

All right. If you’re sure…

At the end of The Hanging Tree the Faceless Man was identified as one Martin Chorley, overall rich white dude with an obsession with Tolkien and, oh. Right. Magically splicing people with animals, murdering several individuals, and even accidentally having a hand in his own daughter’s death. Dude’s as bad an egg as can be. And he’s got Lesley on his side.

The plan this time? Summon Mr. Punch, kill him, and take his power à la Highlander in order to become a god. Honestly? That sounds about right for the Faceless Man. Not like he ever had small ambitions.

mr punch
as if this face isn’t terrifying enough, I’ve also read these books. Punch and Judy is forever ruined.

In this newest book, things seem to come full circle. Mr. Punch gets what’s his. Bev, Guleed, Nightingale, and even Molly all have some plot points either established or resolved, and Peter kinda sorta saves the day.

Well, actually, he cocks everything up trying to do the moral thing and Lesley saves(?) the day while simultaneously getting Peter in deep shit at the Met. She takes off with an ominous, “Don’t try to follow me,” and Peter’s left to clean up the mess of Martin Chorley. Literally.

The book is a blast. A little slow to start, but there are a lot of pieces to weave together and not so many pages to do it in. There’s also a lot of hints at where the series may go from here, with little tidbits about what some of the side characters might get up to in the coming books. I even cried at one point, because something really wonderful happens to Molly and I was legitimately overjoyed for her.

My only gripe is the ending, which I don’t want to get into in too much detail. And it’s not the ending necessarily, but what Aaronovitch decides to make of that ending in whatever story comes next. He’s set himself up for some wicked trope potholes, and I hope he’s able to navigate them in twisted and interesting ways.

But I’m afraid he won’t. He hasn’t fallen into any of them yet, so I’m not sure why I’m so worried, but I am. Time will tell how he handles this new development in the series.

However, as a book in a series, Lies Sleeping was quite, quite good. A fast read with the expected witty dialogue and great character development and setting. Yet again, I felt like I’ve known London my whole life, instead of only having visited for three days when I was fifteen. In just under 300 pages almost every side character known in the series had a moment in the spotlight, which was a bit busy, but still welcome. I love these characters.

I hope there are many Rivers of London books to come, and we at least know that Aaronovitch is working on another novella in the Rivers of London series, The October Man. In the meantime, I’m reading The Black God’s Drums by P. Djèlí Clark right now, and likely to finish it tonight or tomorrow. Since it’s a novella, look for my thoughts on it in the March Reading Round Up.

I’ll be back tomorrow to talk about goals and such, and the have the February Reading Round up posted later in the week. Then we’re on vacation!

Talk soon, Bloggarts!

 

BZ

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s